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Holditch Colliery
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Men working coal by machine. Winghay seam, Silverdale Colliery in Newcastle-under-Lyme

Working coal by machine (Winghay seam at Silverdale Colliery, Newcastle-under-Lyme). Image reproduced by kind permission of the British Coal Corporation.


Holditch Colliery in Chesterton is an ancient industrial site; archaeological investigations have revealed that coal was being worked in the area as long as 2000 years ago. The colliery, known locally as Brymbo (some roads in the area still bear this name) operated between 1912 and 1989. Prior to nationalisation of the coal industry in 1947 it, like
Apedale Colliery, was managed by the Shelton Iron, Steel & Coal Company which also operated the steel works at Shelton bar.

Holditch was a very gas rich colliery which supplied large amounts of gas to local brickworks (the gas was used to provide fuel for firing) from the mid 1970s. The amount of coal produced varied considerably, the highest figure being over 400,000 tonnes worked by nearly 1500 men in 1947. Mining was carried out from 2 main shafts. Coal mining is a dangerous profession and in 1937 an explosion at Holditch Colliery killed 37 men.

For more information about Holditch Colliery click here